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Gemstone Size ,Weight and Carat:

Gemstone Size

Weight and Carat:

Carat: Is the weight of a gemstone.

The picture above is a 59carat Topaz. We found at O’Brien Creek.

Weight, Carat and  Size  is important to know when buying and selling gemstones. It is hard buying gemstones with out seeing it, Often the larger the stone the more valuable it is, not the case. You have to take in the colour,  clarity, and inclusions (flaws). Picking up a gemstone, look at it under a light or loupe, If you can see right through it , is a good sign it is a great gemstones. Check  the  size dimensions in millimetres when you are buying gemstone and don’t rely on carat weight alone.

My first gemstone I bought was a green diamond it was .01 carat stone, 01 Carat stone is the size is smaller than a grain of fine sand. The gemstone was a green diamond, cost $10 Australian Dollars, if you look at it under a loupe you can see about 18 faceted cut in the stone. The $10 was a great investment as it is a real eye opener .I don’t know if it was a real diamond, at a guest no.

Price:

Gemstone Carat Chart

  1. Carat=0,2 Grams      26 Carat =5.2 Grams   51 Carat= 10.2 Grams     76 Carat= 15.2 Grams
  2. Carat=0.4 Grams        27 Carat= 5.4 Grams    52 Carat= 10.4 Grams       77 Carat= 15.4 Grams
  3. Carat=0.6 Grams        28 Carat= 5.6 Grams    53 Carat= 10.6 Grams       78 Carat= 15.6 Grams
  4. Carat=0.8 Grams        29 Carat= 5.8 Grams    54 Carat= 10.8 Grams       79 Carat= 15.8 Grams
  5. Carat=1   Grams         30 Carat=6     Grams    55 Carat= 11    Grams       80 Carat= 16    Grams
  6. Carat=1.2Grams         31 Carat=6.2 Grams     56 Carat= 11.2 Grams       81 Carat= 16.2 Grams
  7. Carat=1.4 Grams        32 Carat=6.4 Grams     57 Carat= 11.4 Grams       82 Carat= 16.4 Grams
  8. Carat=1.6 Grams        33 Carat=6.6 Grams     58 Carat= 11.6 Grams       83 Carat= 16.6 Grams
  9. Carat=1.8 Grams        34 Carat=6.8 Grams     59 Carat= 11.8 Grams       84 Carat= 16.8 Grams
  10. Carat=2    Grams        35 Carat=7    Grams     60 Carat= 12    Grams       85 Carat= 17    Grams
  11. Carat=2.2 Grams        36 Carat=7.2 Grams     61 Carat=12.2 Grams        86 Carat= 17.2 Grams
  12. Carat=2.4 Grams        37 Carat=7.4 Grams     62 Carat=12.4 Grams        87 Carat= 17.4 Grams
  13. Carat=2.6 Grams        38 Carat=7.6 Grams     63 Carat=12.6 Grams        88 Carat= 17.6 Grams
  14. Carat=2.8 Grams        39 Carat=7.8 Grams     64 Carat=12.8 Grams        89 Carat= 17.8 Grams
  15. Carat=3    Grams        40 Carat=8    Grams     65 Carat=13                       90 Carat= 18    Grams
  16. Carat=3.2 Grams        41 Carat=8.2  Grams    66 Carat=13.2 Grams       100 Carat= 20   Grams
  17. Carat=3.4 Grams        42 Carat=8.4  Grams    67 Carat=13.4 Grams      125  Carat= 25   Grams
  18. Carat=3.6 Grams        43 Carat=8.6 Grams     68 Carat=13.6 Grams       150 Carat= 30   Grams
  19. Carat=3.8 Grams        44 Carat=8.8 Grams     69 Carat=13.8 Grams       175 Carat= 35   Grams
  20. Carat=4    Grams        45 Carat=9    Grams     70 Carat=14    Grams       200 Carat= 40  Grams
  21. Carat=4.2 Grams        46 Carat=9.2 Grams     71 Carat=14.2 Grams       250 Carat= 50   Grams
  22. Carat=4.4 Grams        47 Carat=9.4 Grams     72 Carat=14.4 Grams       300 Carat= 60  Grams
  23. Carat=4.6 Grams        48 Carat=9.6 Grams     73 Carat=14.6 Grams       500 Carat=100 Grams
  24. Carat=4.8 Grams        49 Carat=9.8 Grams     74 Carat=14.8 Grams       750 Carat=150 Grams
  25. Carat=5    Grams        50 Carat=10 Grams      75 Carat=15    Grams     1000 Carat=200 Grams

Meaning of Lapidary–a person who cuts, polishes, or engraves of stones and  gems.

Join your local Lapidary Club

They should  be able to tell you every thing you need to know about Gemstone ,Rocks  and  fossil .Your local club will also have equipment to cut and polish your stones you find.

I love hearing stories about what gemstones other people have found, and where. Write a comment. And tell your story about Gemstones where you go. Your best find.

Thank You Have a Wonderful Day.

Wendy.

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Gemstones Crystals. A-L Names and Pictures

Gemstone – Crystal A-L Name Of Gemstone Crystal. -With Images of gemstones. Rough/Faceted

Agate, Amethyst, Aquamarine, Azurite, Beryl, Bloodstone, Charoite, Chrysocolla, Citrine, Diamond, Emerald, Haematite, Iolite, Jade, Jasper, Malachite,  Opal, Peridot, Rhodonite, Ruby, Sapphire, Sunstone, Tanzanite, Tiger Eye, Tourmaline.

Agate.            Hardness- 7          Classification- Silicate

whole agate
Whole Agate, Agate Creek.

agate

Colours – Agate come in lot of different beautiful colours. Blue, green, red, yellow, orange, browns, purples, whites so on.

Agate is found in lots of different  place around the world. Australia,  North West Queensland  there, is several places to go different colors, 5 minutes from where  I am no you can get Gooseberry Agates.

Around the world, some of the places you can get agate are. Austria, China, India, Brazil, Mexico, California, Botswana, Madagascar

Agate
Agate is a form of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers in a remarkable variety of colors and textures. Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. It was said to quench thirst and protect from fevers. Collecting agate bowls became common among European royalty during the Renaissance and many museums in Europe, including the Louvre, have spectacular examples..

Agate Geode

Agate is a form of chalcedony quartz that forms in concentric layers in a remarkable variety of colors and textures. Agate was highly valued as a talisman or amulet in ancient times. Geodes are rock cavities or vugs with internal crystal formations or concentric banding. Cut in slices, agate geodes are popular with collectors and jewellery designers.

Amazonite.    Hardness is 6-65    Classification-Silicate

Amazoniteamazonite1

Color – The Color is green.

Found in – USA, Russia, Canada, Brazil, India, Mozambique, Namibia, Austria, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Australia.

I have never found Amazonite, I have watched the prospectors show on TV, finding  Amazonite all the time. Here in Australia you can find it around Broken Hill in New South Wales.

Amazonite
Amazonite is a gemstone variety of green microcline, a feldspar mineral. It is named after the Amazon river in Brazil, though surprisingly no deposits have been found in that location. The lively green or blue-green colour is extremely attractive. Amazonite, cut en cabochon, with a rounded and convex polished surface, is a classic stone to be set in silver or carved in imaginative forms. In fact a fine quality amazonite can be mistaken for precious jade. Amazonite does not undergo any kind of treatment. Amazonite is gaining popularity but is still an affordable fine gem for its carat weight.

Amazonite is said to calm one’s emotions and soothe nerves, and to enhance creativity and the ability to express oneself. Perhaps the strongest recommendation for its metaphysical power is that Amazonite is said to makes your married life happier.

Amber.                Hardness  2+        Classification: Mineraloid ( Organic Compound.)

amber
amber

amber5Amber Australia

Amber is found in most countries around the world. Britain, Canada, Dominican, Republic, Italy, Germany, Lebanon, Poland, Romania, Mexico, Myanmar, Baltic Sea and Northern Australia.

Amber, non-crystalline structure.

Amblygonite.                        Hardness 5-5.6          Classification– Phosphate.

amblygoniteamblygonite2

amblygonite1

Amblygonite color- White/Greyish, Light yellow, pink or lilac, Greenish.

Country found Sweden, France, Australia, Brazil, USA.

Amethyst.                      Hardness–7                Classification– Silicate.

amethamethys

Amethyst come in a lot of different colour purples.

Amethyst is found in a lot of different places around the world. Some  of the largest is from Russia, Namibia, South Africa, Brazil, Canada, USA, Australia.

Ametrine.              Hardness–6                  Classification– Silicate.

ametrine2ametrine1ametrine.png

Ametrine –Colours are Purple to Yellow.

Found in Bolivia.

Ametrine
Quartz which occurs in bands of yellow and purple has been given the name of ametrine (amethyst + citrine).

Initially cutters favored windowed emerald shapes with a 50/50 split of colors, and much of the rough is still cut this way. More recently, however, some cutters have begun to cut a variety of shapes, many of which create internal reflections that blend the yellow and purple into attractive shades of rosy gold and mauve, or create mosaic-like flashes of both yellow and purple.

Aquamarine.             Hardness. 7-8                  Classification– Silicate.

aquaaqua2aqua1

Colour is Sea Green-Light Blue.

Found in Ireland, Russia, USA, Mexico, Brazil,  Afghanistant,  Pakistan, India, Zimbabwe, Australia.

Aquamarine
Aquamarine is best known for its breathtaking range of blue colors and belongs to the same family as emerald (beryl). The name derives from the Latin expression for seawater. Aquamarine is colored by trace amounts of iron that find their way into the crystal structure. A dark blue is the most desired color. Aquamarine possesses a durable hardness (7.5-8 on Mohs scale), which qualifies it for any kind of jewelry.

The favored cuts are emerald (step) and brilliant cut with long or rectangular shapes. Turbid stones get a cabochon cut.

Aquamarine is a decorative gem that complements almost any skin or eye color, which makes it an all-time favorite for women the world over. It is a popular gem, universal to wear, readily available and moderately priced, but growing in popularity.

Aventurine.                 Hardness 7                Classification  Silicate

aventurine1aventurine3aventurineaventurine2

Azeztulite.                        Hardness  7                   Classification    Silicate.

azeztuliteazeztulite1azeztulite2azeztulite3

Colour  Colourless or White.

Found . North Carolina.

Azurite.                        Hardness.  3.5-4             Classification.  Hydrated Carbonate.

azuriteazurite1azurite3azurite2

Colours.  Light to Dark Blue.

Found. France, Egypt, China, Australia, USA, Peru.

Beryl.                                      Hardness 7.5-8           Classification  Silicate.

berylberyl2beryl3beryl1

Colour          Colourless, Yellowish, Green, Red, Gold, Pink.

Found.  Spain, Russia, Namibia, Madagascar, Pakistan, Colombia, Brazil, USA, Australia.

Beryl Gems
Beryl in its purest form is completely colourless (goshenite). Trace impurities and colouring agents are responsible for the many different colors found in gemstone varieties of beryl. Beryl is one of the most important mineral groups and also one of the biggest gemstone groups. Although the mineral is abundant, it rarely occurs in transparent gem-quality material. Transparent gem-quality beryl is referred to as ‘precious beryl’. The most famous beryl gemstone is green emerald, followed by blue aquamarine. Golden beryl is not very well-known by the general public. Other popular beryl gems include pink ‘morganite’ and white, or colourless, ‘goshenite’. Red beryl is the rarest variety of beryl and it is known in the trade as ‘bixbite’.

Bloodstone.           Hardness  7.                  Classification Silicate.

bloodstonebloodstone1bloodstone2bloodstone3

Colour.   Dark Green/Grey, Flecked Red.

Found. India, USA, Australia.

Bloodstones
Bloodstone, also known as heliotrope, is a green gemstone dotted with bright red spots of iron oxide. A form of chalcedony quartz, the name heliotrope comes from the fact that polished stones were once thought to reflect the sun. Bloodstone is the original Birthstone for March. In the Middle Ages the red spots were thought to be the blood of Jesus and the stone was believed to have miraculous powers.

Boji Stone.                  Hardness  7.4               Classification  Mineraloid

boji stone1boji stone

Colours.   Dark grey, Brown.

Found.  Kansas, USA.

Calcite.                           Hardness 3                     Classification    Carbonate.

calcite2calcite3calcitecalcite1

Colour.  Colourless, Red, Yellow, Gold, Green, Blue.

Found. UK, Belgium, Iceland, USA, Brazil, India, Germany.

Carnelian.              Hardness 7                 Classification  Silicate.

carneliancaenelian3carnelian2carnelian1

Colour.         Orange, Red Brown, Pink.

Found. India, Australia, Brazil, Britain, Iceland.

Charoite.         Hardness 5                   Classification  Silicate.

charoite3charoite2charoite1charoite

Colour. Purple.

Found.  Russia.

Chrysocolla.           Hardness  2-4          Classification  Silicate.

chrysocollachrysocolla1chrysocolla2chrysocolla3

Colour.  Green, Blue/Green.

Found USA, Israel, Zaire, UK, Australia.

Chrysocolla
Chrysocolla is a hydrous copper silicate with that is found in several places in the world, including Russia, Nevada in the USA, the Congo, Chile, Israel and Mexico. Often confused with turquoise, chrysocolla is often found in unusual multi colour combinations as well as in blue or green.

Chrysoprase.          Hardness.  7.           Classification  Silicate.

chrysoprasechrysoprase1chrysoprase2chrysoprase3

Colour. Bright Green.

Found. Australia, Russia, USA, Brazil.

Citrine.        Hardness  7.          Classification  Silicate.

citrinecitrine3citrine2citrine1

Colour. Yellow. (Pale to Golden Brown).

Found. Spain, Russia, France, Madagascar, Brazil, Australia.

Citrine
Citrine is one of the most affordable yet durable gemstones. Named from the French name for lemon,”citron,” many citrines have a juicy lemon color. Citrine includes yellow to gold to orange-brown shades of transparent quartz. Although the darker, orange colours of citrine, sometimes called Madeira citrine after the colour of the wine, has generally been the most valued colour, in modern times, many people prefer the bright lemony shades which mix better with pastel colours. Citrine is generally more inexpensive than amethyst and is also available in a wide range of calibrated sizes and shapes, including very large sizes.

Danburite.           Hardness 7.             Classification   Silicate.

danburite1danburitedanburite2danburite3

Colour.       Colourless, White, Rose, Yellow, Lilac.

Found.  USA, Russia, Japan, Mexico, Myanmar.

Diamond.          Hardness 10.           Classification Element.

diamond1diamond2diamond3diamond4

Colours.   Colourless, Sometimes Tinged with Yellow, Blue, Brown or Pink.

Found.  South Africa, Russia, Brazil, Australia, USA.

Emerald.               Hardness  7.5-8           classification   Silicate.

emerald3emeraldemerald2emerald1

Colour.  Green

Found. Colombia, Egypt, India, Zimbabwe, Pakistan, Brazil, Madagascar, Russia.

Fluorite.              Hardness  4.                Classification  Salt

fluorite3fluorite1fluorite2fluorite

Colour.  Wide variety, from clear to Black, via Purple, Blue, Green, Yellow, Pink, White, Brown.

Found.  England, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Russia, India, USA, Mexico.

Garnet.           Hardness 6.5-7         Classification    Silicate.

garnet4garnet3garnet5garnet2

Colour. Red, Black, Yellow, Orange, Green, Grey, Colourless (rare).

Found. Worldwide.

Hematite.                     Hardness 5-6           Classification  Oxide.

hematitehematite1haematitehaematite1

Colour.  Steel grey to Black, Red to Brown.

Found.  England, Switzerland, Italy, Australia, Brazil, Canada.

Iolite.             Hardness  7-7.5          Classification  Silicate.

iolite3iolite1ioliteiolite2

 

Colour.    Blue-Violet.

Found.  Brazil, USA, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, Australia.

Jade.

Hardness 6.5-7          Classification  Silicate.

jade3jadejade1jade2

Colour.   Green.

Found.   Russia, China, Burma, Japan, USA, Central America, New Zealand.

Jade Gemstones
What was traditionally called jade is in fact two separate and distinct minerals: jadeite and nephrite. The term ‘jade’ can also be loosely applied to materials that contain jadeite or nephrite, such as maw-sit-sit and other materials. Jade has been treasured for centuries by cultures around the world, including the Mesoamericans and the Chinese, who consider it to be an auspicious gem. Choose jade gems from various shapes, sizes and colors, including green jade and lavender jadeite.

Jasper.     

         Hardness  7                  Classification  Silicate

jas1
rough Jasper
jas2
ocean jasper

jasjas4

Colours.  Green, Red, Yellow, Brown, Blue, Purple, Black. and lots of different mixes of colours.

Found Worldwide.

In its natural environment Jasper, a Form of Chalcedony, is dull stone, but once polished, it is a glistening, opaque crystal whose colour ranges from red, to brownish, yellow to  green. It was widely used in the 16th century in Mosaic work.

Kunzite.                     Hardness 6.5-7.5                 Classification  Silicate.

kun3
natural colour kunzite
kun2
Kunzite
kun
Kunzite Crystal
kun1
Faceted Kunzite

A Lilac

Colours.   Pink-Lilac.

Found in-  USA, Brazil, Canada, Russia, Mexico, Sweden.

Lapis Lazuli.                 Hardness  5.5-6        Classification   Silicate

lap3
Lapis Lazuli Tumbled Stones
lapi1
Lapis Lazuli
lapi
Rough Lapis Lazuli
lap2
Lapis Lazuli

Colour.- Blue.

Found–  Afghanistan, Siberia, Chile, USA, Italy.

Larimar.           Hardness– 5-7                    Classification– Silicate

Polished Larimar stone
Polished Larimar stone
Larimar
Larimar
Rough Larimar
Rough Larimar
Larimar stones
Larimar stones

Colours.–Blue- White.

Found — Dominican Republic.

Lepidolite.                Hardness.– 2.5-3   Classification– Silicate.

leplep1

Natural Lepidolite
Natural Lepidolite
Natural Lepidolite
Natural Lepidolite

Colours. — Pink, Greyish, Lilac, White.

Found– Brazil, Russia, Germany, USA, Mozambique, Madagascar.

For More Information on A-Z Gemstone please click Here.

I hope you enjoyed this page. I have enjoyed read and the research about all these beautiful Gemstones.

Do you know you can Find a stone and make it into jewellery very easy. You can buy your finding, for ear rings, Pendant or ring. You can pay or do it your self. want to know more contact me.

Have a wonderful day enjoy my page leave me a comment.

Thank You.

Wendy.

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Gemstones-Gemhunting- North West Qld-Fossicking Areas.

NW Queensland Fossicking Area’s

Mount Isa and Cloncurry area’s.

Looking for gemstones.

Looking for gems, Gemhunting with other people is more interesting than going by your self. Plus it is much safer in groups.  There is so many place to go between Mt Isa and Cloncurry, area.

All Year round Fossicking.

In the hotter months you do not do much fossicking because the rocks are even very hot, having  a air conditioners in your cars, and having shade when you go fossicking make it a nice day out. You have to start out very early in the morning. Out here it is day light at 6am and it is still day light at 7pm at night, in the summer months.

  When there is no rain.

Camping And Fossicking in cooler Months of the year.

I live in Mount Isa. North West Queensland. Only over the past 4 years have I been Interested in Fossicking for Gems- Stone. I am still a newbie. Lots more to learn. Fossicking is all year hobby. When there is rain, no way do you go on a dirt road, you are asking for trouble.

North West Queensland Fossicking Area’s.

You have to have a Fossicking Licence, before you can go Gem hunting in Queensland. If you are looking for gems-stones-rocks-gold, you have to have a licence,

Out here you can explore the country side, bush,  if you have a 4 wheel drive and a good GPS.  So easy to get lost.

Get Permission.

Remember the land belongs to some one, so you could need permission to go on there land. Find out from the locals Lapidary Clubs. Or go to Government website to find out more..qld.gov.au

You are stupid if you go out exploring when it is wet. Raining.

We nearly  got caught, 3 times in 2016 June, July and October. We packed up quick, we could see the rain coming. We were lucky we did not get stuck in the mud. The clean up took a week to do. Not much fun.

Weather. No Phone.

In the North West we do not get very good weather reports, our report is possible showers that never happen. over phone coverage is gone 5 minutes out of town. That is why you show have a good GPS. Ours has bird eye view, so you can see the country side ahead of you. It tracks you where you go, and when you get out of the car, you put it in your pocket. No chance of getting lost that way.  If you have not got a GPS mark your trip, when you get out the car mark your track, use rocks.

Take your own water.

Take your own water, most of the creeks beds are  dry. Water for drinking and washing your hands and stones.

Out of Date Books.

There is a lot of books out there that are out of date. Pictures  Most  Placers  are not accessible in the wet.  our country is red/black mud. even a 4 wheel drive can not handle it most of the time. Going on roads after flooding only wrecks the roads for everyone else.   No one grades the roads we go on, if you check with your insurance company you will find even your car is not insured on these roads.

Want to go Fossicking.  Not Sure where to go.

If you want to go fossicking and you are not sure where to go, Ask your Question, I might be able to answer you. Most people out here are very friendly. Best idea is to go into the tourist shop, in the town you are visiting, buy a sample of the stone you are looking for. ( Remember to support these shops they have to make a living).

Places you can go between Mount Isa and Cloncurry.

Going from Mount Isa.

Mount Frosty.

Wee Macgregor Mine.

Crystal Mountain

Maltese Cross

Toms Mountain

Fountain Springs.

Old mine towns.

Smoky Crystals

Mary Kathleen

And lots more fossicking areas.

Some of the Gem Stones/Rock you can find.

Amethyst. ( lots of different shades).

Garnets.

Crystals.

Maltese Cross.

Peacock Ore.

Sunset Opal.

Topaz

Smokey Quarts.

Quarts (different colours.)

lead

copper

Agate. There are lots of different ones.

Ribbon Stone.

Aquamarine

Beryl

Calcite

Spinel

Chrysocolla

Boulder Opal

Sapphire

Tiger Eye

Lolite

Rhyolite

Jasper

Pyrite

Malachite

Tourmaline

Magnetite

Moonshine

Peridot

Prehnite

Zircon

Rutile.

Pink Quarts.

I have found the above in Queensland and Northern Territory. Australia.

If you are visiting Mount Isa. Visit Our local Lapidary Club

Have a great day.

Happy Fossicking.

If you enjoy this website please leave a comment.

This website is some thing new I am learning to do, so be patient, ask me a Question if I can not answer you, I will find some one else, that  might be able to answer you.

Happy Fossicking.

Wendy.

.

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Prehnite Gemstone.

Prehnite

In the image above the prehnite is a cloudy green.

Prehnite Gemstone often appear Cloudy or velvety, and rarely fully Transparent.

The prehnite here was found in the N.T. Australia.

Picture below you can see the Cloudy  green to yellow colour.

 

You can make nice Cabochon  to make Jewellery, with this stone.

The most popular shapes include traditional oval, cushion and round shapes. Fancy shapes are not as popular, but can be found, including hearts, trillions and pears.

Prehnite may also be tumbled or beaded and it is a popular ornamental material used for decorative carvings.

When polished, prehnite has a vitreous to pearly luster. Prehnite may be confused with Apatite, Jade or Serpentine.

 

Prehnite .It was discovered in 1788 in the Karoo Dolerites of Cradock, South Africa.Prehnite was later named after its discoverer, Colonel Hendrik Von Prehnite (1733-1785). he was a Dutch Mineralogist
and an early governor of the Cape of Good Hope colony.

Prehnite was the first mineral to be named after an individual, and it was also the first mineral to be described from South Africa, long before South Africa became one of the most important sources for precious and semi Precious gemstone. .

Until recently, Prehnite was a rare collector’s gemstone, but new deposits have now made it more readily available. In China, prehnite is sometimes referred to as ‘grape jade’ owing to nodular formations which often resemble a bunch of grapes. Its colour is usually a soft apple green which is quite unique to prehnite, but it can also occur in rarer colours including yellow, orange and blue.

Mohs Scale.
Prehnite is considerably hard with a rating of 6 to 6.5 on the Mohs scale.

Prehnite; Origin and Sources

Prehnite occurs in the veins and cavities of mafic volcanic rock. It is a typical product of low-grade metamorphism. Primary deposits of prehnite are sourced from several locations around the world. Some of the most important deposits come from Africa (Namibia, South Africa), Australia (Western Australia, Northern Territory), Canada, China, Germany, Scotland, France and the United States (New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Virginia).

Rare, orange colored prehnite has been discovered in South Africa. Quebec, Canada is known to produce prehnite with distinct, individual crystals.

Buying Prehnite and Determining Prehnite Value

Prehnite occurs in a range of green colors, including pale green to dark green and yellow- to brown-green. Prehnite may also occur gray, blue, orange, white and colorless. A soft apple green color is most desirable, while blue, pink, colorless, white and orange are considered the rarest occurrences and are highly sought after by mineral collectors.

Prehnite: Related or Similar Gemstones

There are no closely related gemstones, but there are several gemstones which can have a very similar appearance (colour and lustre ), including jade, apatite, serpentine, brazilianite, peridot and more.

8.98ct Oval Facet Green Prehnite

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Gemstone-New to looking for Gemstones.

How to identify a gemstones you are going to go Fossick for. (dig) 

New to Looking for Gemstone.

First Question what am I looking For.

When you are new to looking for gemstones, one of your first Question will be what am I looking for. You can look up the internet for pictures or go to a gemstone shop near where,  your going to fossick ( or dig) is the best way .

I always stop and usually buy a natural rough gemstone, that I will be looking for. PLEASE  Remember these people have to make a living so do buy something. Most of the time they have maps of the area and give advise to where you should start  looking, and what to look for.

I must say the best is the  tag a-long tours, they  are a great way to find out a real lot of information. Last on we did cost only $40  each.

If you need some help or do not understand about finding Gemstones contact me.

Sometime the directions are really bad, we have gone out several times, not been able to find a spot.

Happy Fossicking.

Wendy